Is Your Elevator Pitch Everything It Should Be?

Is Your Elevator Pitch Everything It Should Be?

Take a second to go over your elevator pitch, and ask yourself these three questions:

  1. Is my pitch unique from those of other agents?
  2. Do I use more “you” pronouns than “I” pronouns?
  3. Does my pitch end with a CTA (call to action)?

If the answer is no to any of these questions, chances are your 30-second real estate pitch may need some fine-tuning. It’s crucial that when someone asks you what you do, you give them an answer that highlights your successes while also speaking to their personal needs. Let’s examine the questions from above and discover why they are important.

Is My Pitch Unique?

Don’t tell them you’re a real estate agent

We’re not suggesting you lie, rather that you do more than state the obvious.

You have to find a way to stand out from other real estate agents. If someone asks what you do and you reply that you’re a Realtor, you are instantly painting a picture in their minds of what a real estate agent does, and you want to point out that you’re more than that. An effective elevator pitch will speak to your particular niche. Consider your strengths and design your pitch around what sets you apart from other agents.

Do I Use More “You” Pronouns Than “I” Pronouns?

Address them on a personal level 

The first thing you should do is identify a problem that lots of people face when it comes to real estate. For instance, “You know how buying in a seller’s market makes it nearly impossible to get a good deal?” After you address a problem that lots of people have, dazzle ‘em with your solution. “Well I help homebuyers like you get the most home for their money, no matter the housing climate.”

The use of the you pronoun personalizes the message and makes your audience feel like you are speaking to their experiences and not delivering a speech.

When you sell yourself in this way, people are much more likely to refer you to someone they know who just happens to be having bad luck finding the right home in their budget.

Bonus: After you hook them, follow up with some proof: “In fact, I helped more than 40 homebuyers so far this year buy homes well within their budget.”

Does It End With a CTA?

Give them something to do next

The best way to end an elevator pitch is with action steps for your audience to take next. Invite them to follow you on social media, ask them to sign up for your eNewsletter, tell them to check out your website — anything that will prompt them to take a step toward using your services.

Business cards are fine, but it’s even better if you can show them your Facebook or Twitter and get them to hit follow right then and there. Or get them to sign up for your email newsletter to receive routine communication from you. If you’re not set up with your own real estate newsletter to send to clients, click here.

Don’t get locked into a stock image of what people think of when you say you’re a real estate agent or Realtor — make them think of your profession in a way they’ve never considered

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